Empowering Women through Conservation Agriculture: Rhetoric or Reality?

TCD Geography’s Jane Maher recently had her excellent research published in a book titled Conservation Agriculture in Subsistence Farming: Case Studies from South Asia and Beyond. Jane contributed a chapter on ‘Empowering Women through Conservation Agriculture: Rhetoric or Reality? Evidence from Malawi’. This chapter sought to examine whether Conservation Agriculture (CA) could play a role in the empowerment of women through agriculture. This was assessed within the analytical framework of the impact CA has on women’s time and labour, agricultural production and household food security, decision-making in the home and social capital.

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Watch out litter, it’s Coastwatch!

This month I participated in Coastwatch’s beach clean-up, which takes place on the first Saturday of each month. The clean took place at Sandymount Strand, which is said to be the most famous beach in Irish history, having featured in the epic novel, Ulysses:

“In long lassoes from the Cock lake the water flowed full, covering greengoldenly lagoons of sand, rising, flowing.”– Ulysses, James Joyce.

Plastic bag ruining the iconic view of Sandymount Strand (Image: Bas Boots)
Plastic bag ruining the iconic view of Sandymount Strand (Image: Bas Boots)

Continue reading “Watch out litter, it’s Coastwatch!”

Distant Strangers and the Illusion of Separation

The peoples of the world’s developing nations are far-off, vague and unfamiliar strangers to us in the developed world – a collective group of people whom we feel little or no responsibility towards. So argues leading philosopher, climate change and human rights expert Professor Henry Shue in his recent lecture on climate justice in Trinity College. ‘The illusion of separation’ as proposed by Professor Shue, sets up a model where there is an ‘us’ in the developed world and a ‘them’ in the developing world. This model allows ‘us’ the ability to act immorally and without responsibility for our actions, as the consequences of those actions are not witnessed by us and so we can easily wipe our hands clean of any responsibility.

Pictured at the occaision (l-r): Katarzyna Czaplicka (UNDP), Jonathan Claridge (European Commission), Dr Lorna Gold (Trocaire), Professor Henry Shue, Professor Juliett Hussey (VP for Global Relations Trinity). Soource: Trinity News and Events
Pictured at the occaision (l-r): Katarzyna Czaplicka (UNDP), Jonathan Claridge (European Commission), Dr Lorna Gold (Trocaire), Professor Henry Shue, Professor Juliett Hussey (VP for Global Relations Trinity). Source: Trinity News and Events

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Science Squad

Earlier this month TCD Mars research, in both Geography and Astrophysics, was featured on RTE.

Dr. Mary Bourke discussing the landscape of Mars on Science Squad
Dr. Mary Bourke discussing the landscape of Mars on Science Squad

On November 10th, the Science Squad investigated Mars and the possibility for human settlement on Mars. In the show, Mary Bourke from TCD Geography discusses her research on Mars’ geomorphology.  Joe Roche discusses his participation with the Mars One project which is looking to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars starting in 2024.

To see the show, watch it on RTE Player here (available until 2nd December)

First Indian mission to Mars: A student’s point of view

We Earthlings have long been intrigued by the Red planet. Albeit smaller than the Earth, the fourth planet from the Sun shares a lot of common features with our home world: Mars has seasons, polar ice caps, familiar landform features, and signs that water once flowed over its surface.

Mars was always focus of interest of planetary scientists and astronomers. The race for exploring Mars began in 1960 with a failed attempt by Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos). After many failures of Soviet Union and the USA, the first success came with the Mariner 4 spacecraft which flew by Mars in 1965 taking 21 images.

Until now, only three space agencies have been able to reach Mars (Roscosmos, NASA and ESA). After 54 years since the first attempts, the Indian Space Research Agency (ISRO) has joined the club of nations who have reached the red plant. This is great technological feat by ISRO, and means that India have became the first nation to reach Mars orbit in its very first attempt and the first Asian nation to do so. ISRO launched its first inter-planetary mission to the planet with an orbiter craft designed to orbit Mars in an elliptical orbit.

Trajectory Design of Mars Orbiter Mission.  (Image Credit: ISRO)
Trajectory Design of Mars Orbiter Mission. (Image Credit: ISRO)

Continue reading “First Indian mission to Mars: A student’s point of view”